Wednesday, September 4, 2013

What is Permaculture?

"Permaculture is a design system inspired by nature which is based on ethics and design principles that can be used to guide you, your household and your community ‘beyond sustainability’.

By adopting the ethics and applying these principles in our daily life we can make the transition from being dependent consumers to becoming responsible producers. This journey builds skills and resilience at home and in our local communities that will help us prepare for an uncertain future with less available energy."    

From the website permacultureprinciples.com




"Is it possible to create more abundance in our lives? Develop an intimate relationship with the natural world? And, at the same time, address our ecological crisis? We believe that permaculture offers a key. 

Simply put, permaculture is a design science that is rooted in the observation of nature. It’s a positive, solution-based way of thinking, using a practical set of ecological design principles and methods. Permaculture principles provide a way of thinking that enables people to provide for food, energy, shelter, and other material and non-material needs.

You can apply permaculture to any setting or climate – your garden, your farm or ranch, urban and suburban community structures, watershed systems, and your own inner ecology. Permaculture is focused on taking challenges and transforming them into solutions. 

Where Did It Come From?


The idea of designing our lives based on natural systems is not new – our ancestors naturally embodied these concepts for centuries. Indigenous cultures still do, today.

More recently, Bill Mollison and David Holmgren, from Australia, developed the concept of permaculture in the 1970s and first taught permaculture as an applied design system in 1981. There was no term at the time for “sustainable culture,” so they coined the term "permaculture" to articulate the notion of "permanent agriculture." It evolved into the notion of "permanent culture," since culture and agriculture reflect each other.


How Does It Work?

Permaculture asks: how do we – as a human species – sustain ourselves and provide for our needs and the needs of the environment for an indefinite period of time? Permaculturists are looking for the answers by using the principles and methods to create productive ecosystems that have the stability, diversity, and resilience of natural ecosystems.

The permaculture designer looks for ways to integrate water catchment, human shelter and energy systems with tree crops, edible and useful perennials, self-seeding annuals, domestic and wild animals and aquaculture.  

For example, the excess or waste products from plants, animals and human activities are used as nutrients to benefit other elements in the system. Plantings are arranged in patterns that can catch water, filter toxins, absorb nutrients and sunlight and block the wind. Particular associations of trees, perennial vines, shrubs and ground covers known to nourish and protect one another are clustered together. Ponds and other elements are constructed in patterns that maximize their edges to take advantage of the increased biological activity at the intersection of two ecosystems.

Creating a permaculture environment is a gradual and long-range process. To implement a design, the permaculturist looks for the right timing and keeps the design flexible, so that changes can be made as observation of the land and the system, and experience, bring new understanding.

Permaculturists also use "quick-start" techniques, like covering weedy or compacted areas with a "sheet compost" – laying on newspapers, cardboard and straw, watering thoroughly, making little planting holes in the mulch, inserting soil and seedlings, and then letting the worms, bugs, fungus, micro-organisms and roots do the rest.

Permaculture adopts techniques and principles from disciplines and traditions, old and new, such as indigenous land use and food systems, natural building materials like earth, straw, stone and bamboo as well as renewable energy systems.


How Do I Learn Permaculture?

The education system within the permaculture community, still based on Mollison and Holmgren’s first course, is a two-week intensive design course. These courses are offered globally. The curriculum transcends cultural, religious, political and economic boundaries, though no two designs or trainings are exactly the same.

Today, tens of thousands of people around the planet have taken workshops and seminars, forming a loose global network of practicing permaculturists. The global permaculture community actively evolves through workshops, journals, books, web sites, design certification courses, and most importantly through personal experimentation.


People inspired by this exploration manifest a vision of bounty and ecological balance in their gardens, homes, workplaces, and communities. Their work fosters a growing understanding of nature's patterns and generates models of sustainable living – always with the goal of achieving maximum productivity with minimal labor and other inputs. "

From Penny Livingston-Stark at RDI regenerativedesign.org



These courses are taught worldwide in rural and urban areas, for farmers and city folk alike. 

Friday, August 16, 2013

Backyard Permaculture!

Digging the first swale in 2006.



2007.  First year's garden after our Permaculture design implementation began.  


 The garden in August of 2013.

It now includes ducks, chickens, honeybee hives, annual and perennial food crops, 20 fruit trees, berries, grapes, fruit-bearing shrubs, medicinal herbs, dye and cordage plants, 3000 gallons of rainwater catchment, a rainwater-fed pond-to-garden system, a greywater-fed garden (left of the pathway), prolific backyard composting operation and an operating greenhouse built with 95% recycled materials.  All on a 6000 square foot lot with a 1200 square foot house and a five minute walk to downtown.   Urban Permaculture! 


Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Letters from the Kids

These letters just came in the mail from the first graders who visited us last month. Excuse their spelling errors. It is their thoughts that really count.

We had two hours together. They fed snails and worms to the ducks, checked the temperature of the compost piles, examined our rainwater-fed duck pond and fed the fish in it, harvested Calendula flowers, explored the greenhouse made of recycled redwood and salvaged stained glass, collected warm chicken eggs, heard a Mockingbird do a variety of other birds' calls, decorated easter eggs with berries and flowers, and ate lunch in the garden.


 Dear Suzanne, 
I lovd the ducks and I also lovd feeding the ducks and also lovd the chickins. I also lovd holding the snales and worms. I also lovd wen we were picking the flawers. And I also lovd macking the Easter eggs and I also lovd finding eggs. That was fun wen we wer living (leaving) at the last moment a chickin lade a egg. Thank you it was a funn day.
Love, Tierra


 Dear Suzanne, 
 I liked the ducks because I like the noise they made. I liked the chickens noises and thair soft fethers and i also liked the stinky-stinky-stinky composts. It was enteresting checing the dugrees and the hot hot mud by mud i meen soiol (soil). And I alsow liked painting the eggs. Thank yuo for inviting us to your farm. 
 Sincerely, Alex 


 Dear Suzanne, 
 I liked feeding the ducks. I also liked peting the chickens. I also liked harvesting the flowers. I liked the smell of the farm. I also liked hearing the sound of the birds. I also liked decorating the Easter Eggs. I also liked collecting the chicken eggs. I also liked going in the greenhouse. 
 Love, Devi 
 

Dear Suzanne, 
 I loved wen wee fed the ducks snails. I liked peting the chicen. I like how you dye peices of cloth it looks reale cool. I also liked wen wee dyeed Easter eggs. And I thingk that it is cool the way you get water in the duck pool. And I thingk it was reely fun! Thank you a lot! 
Sincerely, Zoe


This boy had a really hard time settling into the visit here. He wouldn't touch anything or participate until the very end when I led him into the greenhouse to meet a worm. I left him there and he stayed for a long time emerging happy and with a new friend in his hand.

Dear Suzanne, 
I lovd making frinds with a worm. Gathering flowers and decorating eggs was fantastic. I loved the greenhouse. The colored glass and the special wood and the plants made it really beautful. I loved your garden. 
Thank you. 
From, 
Nathan

THIS is why I work with kids here at the ol' homestead.

Wednesday, April 11, 2012

Goats and Sheep Mow Through Town

Yesterday we went for a hike at La Cresta Ridge. It was a lovely rainy day. The hills all around us were green. We were happy to find the goats and sheep back this year. Today, the goats were huddled together under cover trying to stay dry. They were a wonderful assortment.
Last year was the first time they were employed to do the mowing. For years the land had been disced and torn up. Now, the goats and sheep munch the grass, Mustard, Wild Radish, and Fennel down to the ground. And, while they are munching away they are fertilizing the the fields. I just love this kind of win-win situation!

Monday, April 9, 2012

Honeybees Like to Play Too!


Tonight at dinner time Eden called from down the street to tell us about a swarm of bees at the library playground. We grabbed an empty hive box, put two half-frames of honey in to make the bees happy and some drawn out comb. Packed the bee brush, bee suit, gloves, and some screen to block the entrance of the hive for transport and loaded up the truck.


We arrived to find some boys hanging out at the playground. They had put up a sign warning people about the bees gathered underneath the slide platform. They said, "We've been watching them all day!". I talked with them about the swarm and they already knew quite a bit about honeybees. Still, they had lots of questions about all kinds of bees and wasps.


As I talked to the boys Paul swept the big clumps of bees into the hive box and waited for the remaining bees to follow. After a very short time everyone was inside the hive box and we were ready to go! Yay! First swarm of the season! "Thank You" Eden.

Friday, April 6, 2012

Indian Runner Ducks for the Urban Homestead


We have just added two Indian Runner ducklings to our flock of Khaki Campbells. These are the two most recommended breeds for the backyard flock. Both are good foragers and highly productive egg layers. The female Indian Runner lays 150-200 eggs a year or more. They were discovered on the Indonesian Islands of Lombok, Java and Bali where they were "walked' to market and sold as egg layers or for meat. They are highly comical as they walk upright like penguins. I have loved "Ferdinand" in the movie BABE since I first laid eyes on him!


These girls will be mainly foragers and slug and snail control. Secondly, they will be egg layers. We have found ducks to lay consistently for only a couple of years. Our chickens have been productive for a longer period of time. We cull the chickens as their production wanes. We do not cull the ducks. They become pets. We are far more enamored with our ducks than with our chickens.

O.k., our original Americauna has been spared out of pure sentimentality! And.... we can't cull our Aracauna because we are too attached to her hawk-like looks and wild-bird ways. We love it when she gets fed up with the other hens' bad behavior and flies the coop to take respite in the Redwood tree! Plus, she's just beautiful! Sorry, I digress.... back to the ducklings. I must confess! I am totally in love with these little girls! They are the cutest thing I've ever seen and just as sweet as pie. They are only four days old and their personality is already showing!


My husband named this one Daisy. She's a bit more 'Dazey' than the flower. She kind of goes through her day eating, pooping, sleeping. You know, the usual baby thing. She doesn't care that she has food all over her face. So what!


This one on the other hand looks you right straight in the eye with pure joy. She is just as pleased as punch to have landed here on earth. She likes to run around happily, smiling as she goes. A duck 'smile' is when they open their bill for no reason other than pure delight!

Welcome to the homestead girls!