Saturday, December 17, 2011

Tis' the Season for Persimmons



Persimmons in the Winter here are like Zucchini in the Summer here. They are everywhere and no one knows what to do with all of them. You might come home to find a bag of them mysteriously deposited on your front porch (we do!). One neighbor simply sets up a flood light aimed up at the tree from the ground just to show the beauty of the bare tree full of bright orange fruit. It is a glorious sight indeed.

I've always let them get soft and then scoop out the pulp for use in puddings, breads and pies. I pre-measure 1-2 cups and freeze it in labeled zip-loc bags for future use. It's funny, I never think to use it until the Fall or Winter. Maybe it's the warm color of it when I'm feeling cold.

Our favorite Persimmon Pudding recipe is from Bradley Ogden's Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner- Savory American Fare for Contemporary Cooks. I also simply substitute persimmon pulp for pumpkin in pie and bread recipes. I'm about to try the "Chocolate Persimmon Muffins" in my new favorite cookbook Good to the Grain- Baking with Whole-Grain Flours.



Yesterday, with a kitchen full of bowls overflowing with Fuyu Persimmons I dried my first batch in the dehydrator. I have to confess here that I am not a fan of the fruit uncooked. It's just too sweet for me. I know LOTS of folks who love to eat Fuyu's like apples and others who love to scoop out the pulp of a very ripe Hachiya. Well, I'm now a fan of the dried fruit. To me it tastes like dried Mango. Yum!

3 comments:

Melany Vorass said...

Wish we had them here. Carlos' mother is very fond of them once they're completely soft. Slices on a drying rack make for a lovely photo!

. . . Lisa and Robb . . . said...

When we bought our tiny house in Oakland, it came with a horribly neglected Fuyu persimmon tree. Two years later, that tree is full of fruit, and I couldn't be happier.

Do you suppose persimmons could be dehydrated in a (1950s) gas oven?

Petaluma Urban Homesteaders said...

Lisa and Robb,

Before I got our dehydrator I used to dry fruit in our 1940's gas oven. I'd put it on the lowest temp and prop the oven door open slightly by sticking a wooden spoon in the door. It was nice in the winter as it heated up the kitchen.

If your oven has a pilot light it is perfect for making your own yogurt in. I'll write up a blog on the subject next. I make a new batch every other week.